General

Cubs & Explorers meet on Monday evenings

Beaver meet on Tuesday evenings

Scouts meet on Thursday evenings

Beavers meet 17:30-18:30

Cubs meet 18:30-20:00

Scouts meet 19:00-21:00

Explorers meet 19:30-21:30

Once invested a monthly direct debit of £12 will be required

Membership is taken monthly by direct debt via our OSM admin system. Event/camp costs vary and are either made by BACS or cheque depending on the amount

Our group colour (blue & green) neckerchief can be bought from our section leaders.

Scouting tops can be bought from the scout store online or local stores like SkoolKit in Totton.

Sea Scout hats can be purchased at a cheaper rate from the group than online.

All items sold by the group can be found on Facebook

Becoming a leader

No, you will learn all the skills you need during your time in the Group. There are training modules required including a DBS check.

No, you can offer as much time as you wish. This could be just normal evening meetings, boating, or both.

It helps to know the basics but any sailing skills required can be learnt through courses during Scouting boating sessions.

Cubs Challenge Award

Take part in two different adventurous activities. At least one of them should be new to you.

2. Take part in six other outdoor activities. At least two of them should be new to you.

3. Go on a hike or follow a trail. Try to walk for about 1-2 hours.

4. Prepare for your activities and hikes. Find out what you need to wear and bring, and pack your own bag. You will need to know what you have with you, and remember everything you need.

  1. Take an active part in at least three nights away, on camps or Pack holidays.
  2. While you’re away, work with other Cubs to do all of these tasks:
    • help to pitch and strike your tent
    • show that you know how to look after yourself and be safe at camp
    • show that you know how to keep your tent and kit safe, tidy and secure
    • cook a meal with your Six
    • build a shelter big enough for two Cubs
    • using bamboos canes, rubber bands or simple lashings complete a simple pioneering project or make a camp gadget
    • learn and follow the Countryside Code
    • show you know what things you need to do to look after your campsite, and that you can put them into practise
    • show that you know how to treat mild burns, scalds, cuts or grazes and make a call to the emergency services.
  3. While you’re away, do at least two of these tasks as well:
    • take part in a wide game
    • take part in a campfire sing-along or other entertainment
    • cook a backwoods meal
    • build a bivouac and sleep in it
    • care for your personal equipment while at camp
    • using knots that you’ve learned, make a simple camp gadget, like a flagpole.

 

  1. Try two new sports or physical activities at least once.
  2. Take part in three activities to help you be healthy.
  3. Pick two creative things to try, and show your leader what you’ve done.
  4. Learn and use at least four of these skills:
    • sew on a button or badge
    • make cakes, bread, biscuits or something similar
    • oil a bicycle chain, change a wheel or fit lights
    • make a cup of tea or coffee, then wash up afterwards
    • lay a table for a meal
    • peel potatoes or other vegetables
    • iron your scarf
    • change a lightbulb, in a table or standard lamp
    • clean a window
    • tidy and clean your bedroom
    • another similar home skill agreed with your leader.
  5. Take part in at least two problem solving activities that you haven’t done before. It should be something that you need to think creatively for. As part of the activity you need to say what you found difficult, what you did to solve the problem, and why.

  1. Create a community map. What services are there? Where are they? Who are they for? Try and visit one of these services if possible.  
  2. As a Pack, identify and complete an activity that benefits your local community. How did it help others? How did the activity help you? What could you do next?
  3. Take part in an act of worship, reflection or celebration.
  4. Find out about a faith or culture you are not familiar with. You could visit a place of worship or a cultural centre in your local community.   
  5. Talk about a time when you did your best. Explain how you have kept your Cub Promise and the Law.         
  6. Take part in an activity about the environment.
  7. Play a game that Cubs play in another country and learn their Promise. 
  8. Celebrate a festival from another country or culture. You could celebrate Holi with a colour party, Brazilian carnival by making masks, or Diwali by making ginger ladoo sweets.

You need to complete two personal challenges that you agree with your leader. You should choose one of the challenges. Your leader will choose the other.

The challenges must be different to the ones that you did for your Beaver Personal Challenge Award.

Once you have done the Teamwork Challenge Award, you can do your Team Leader Challenge Award. Then you need to earn your Team Leader Challenge Award by doing these tasks over at least three months.

  1. Lead your Six in an activity or captain a team.
  2. Help a new Cub to join in with the Pack meeting.
  3. Teach another Cub a new skill.
  4. Ask your Six or team what they want to do in Cubs, tell your leaders and help to make sure that it happens

For this award, you need to do these tasks over at least three months.

  1. Take part in at least six different team games with other Cubs.
  2. Show your leaders what you did to help your team, and how you were a good team player.
  3. Give examples of two different types of teams, and roles in those teams.
  4. Complete at least two teambuilding activities with other Cubs
  5. Take part in at least two Pack forums or something similar, and make a contribution that will be positive for your Pack.

Scouts Challenge Award

  1. Take part in four different adventurous activities. At least two of these activities should be new to you and you should try to do them on at least two separate occasions.
  2. Show how you have developed your skill and expertise in one of these activities. Show that you know the safety issues involved, and that you can use any equipment needed for the activity safely.
  3. Learn about any environmental issues caused by your activity. Take steps to reduce any harm to the environment.
  4. Research other ways you can take part, or develop your skills, in your chosen activities. Follow up your research with action!

  1. Over a period of time, take part in at least four creative activities. Some of these should be new to you.
  2. Show that you have developed your skills in one of these activities. Show that you know how to use any equipment safely.
  3. Use your creative ability to produce something that promotes a Scouting activity or an event.
  4. Construct a model using materials like a plastic kit or recycled items. Alternatively, make a useful item from wood, metal or plastic.
  5. Show how to use social media or the internet in a creative and safe way. Explain why it’s important to use them safely.
  6. Take part in a performance.

  1. Take part in either an expedition or an exploration over two days with 
    at least three other Scouts. This should include a night away at a campsite or hostel.
  2. Take an active part in planning the expedition. Do any training you need and be well prepared.
  1. During the expedition or exploration:
    • play a full part in the team
    • use a map or other navigation device to keep track of where you are
    • cook and eat at least one hot meal
    • do a task, investigation or exploration as agreed with your leader.
  1. Produce an individual report or presentation within the three weeks following your expedition. You could present your work as a project, performance, video recording, oral presentation, blog or website.

  1. Take an active part in at least eight nights away as a Scout. Four of the nights should be camping. While you’re away, work with other Scouts do the other tasks on this list.
  2. With others, pitch and strike your tent.
  3. Lead, or help to lead, a group of Scouts to set up a well-organised site. It should include sleeping tents, food and equipment stores, a fire or stove, kitchen and eating area.
  4. Prepare and light an open fire or set up a suitable stove. Use it to prepare, cook and serve a meal safely.
  5. Understand the three points of the Countryside Code. Show what action you can take to follow the code.
  6. Find out why personal and campsite hygiene is important. What should you do to be hygienic?
  7. Using knots that you have learned, build a simple pioneering project, object or camp gadget.
  8. Explore the environment of your camp and make sure you know where everything  is. Respect the environment you are in and, at the end of the camp, leave the site as you found it.
  9. Find out what accidents and incidents can happen outdoors or during your camp. Show how you would deal with them.
  10. Show how to use an axe, saw or knife safely. You can choose any or all of these tools.
  11. Complete at least four of these tasks:
    • Provide a service commitment to the site for about an hour.
    • Take part in a wide game.
    • Take part in a campfire or other entertainment.
    • Working with others, successfully complete a two-hour activity or project.
    • Plan a balanced menu for a short camp.
    • Lead the cooking of a meal for the group.
    • Show that you know the safety precautions for using lamps and stoves.
    • Cook a backwoods meal with the group.
    • Build a bivouac and sleep in it.
    • Show how to pack a rucksack correctly, with appropriate kit for the camp or event.

Complete two personal challenges which you and your leader agree on. 

You should choose one of the challenges and your leader will choose the other. 

The challenges must be different from the ones you did for your Beaver and Cub Personal Challenge Awards. 

  1. Regularly take part in physical activities over a period of four to six 
    weeks. Keep a record showing your improvement. Your goal could be to develop in an activity or successfully complete a challenge. Physical activity/challenge suggestions:
    • circuit training
    • football skill training
    • aerobic routine
    • synchronised swimming routine
    • Zumba aerobics
    • tap dancing
    • team sports
    • charity swim
    • long distance cycle ride
    • incident hike
    • athletic event
    • pool life-saving test
    • dance competition
  2. Show you understand why eating a sensible diet and getting enough sleep is important.
  3. Do some research so that you can explain the dangers and harmful effects of smoking, alcohol and drugs.
  4. Learn and use at least five of these skills:
    • Mend or customise an item of clothing.
    • Cook and serve a two-course meal, for at least four people.
    • Fix a puncture or a dropped chain on a bike.
    • Wash up after a meal, making sure everything is clean and dry.
    • Use a washing machine to wash a load of clothes.
    • Iron your uniform shirt.
    • Change a lightbulb, in a ceiling light.
    • Set a heating timer and thermostat as needed for the time of year.
    • Clean a toilet, hob or oven.
    • Do another similar home skill.
  5. Take part in at least three activities that require a number of problem solving skills.

To achieve this badge you need to hold the Scout Teamwork Award, and complete these requirements over a period of at least three months:

  1. Successfully lead a Scout team at a camp or all day event. You need to:
    • look after the whole Patrol / team,
    • help individuals in your team if they need it,
    • make sure that your team achieves the goal you have been set.
  2. Help a new Scout to be part of the Troop with an understanding of what is expected of them.
  3. Help another Scout to develop a Scouting skill.
  4. Represent the views of other Scouts (for example at a Patrol Leaders’ Council or something similar) and report back to them afterwards.

This award should be done over a period of at least three months.

  1. On at least three separate occasions, be part of a Scout team, where you work together to achieve a goal.
  2. Give at least three examples of when you’ve been in different types of teams. Explain your role in those teams.
  3. Take part in at least three team building activities that you have not tried before.
  4. Take an active part in at least four Troop or Patrol Forums. At each forum, express your views on at least one item being discussed.

How to earn your award

1.  Choose an aspect of local community life and find out as much as you can about it. You could learn about:

  • local government
  • local history
  • different faiths and beliefs
  • types of farming/industry found locally

2.  Spend a day volunteering with and finding out about a service in your local community:

  • What are their challenges?
  • Who relies on this service?
  • What positive impact could you have on this service in the future?

Services could be homeless shelters, local nature reserves, care homes and food banks. 

3.  Take part in an activity that reflects upon and explores your own beliefs, attitudes and values (this may or may not include religious beliefs). What values do we share as Scouts? Which Scout value means the most to you? 

4.  Take part in an activity that explores common beliefs and attitudes towards gender or disability in different societies. You could look at this in the context of music, sport and fashion. 

5.  Take an active part in an environmental project.

6.  Investigate and try to make contact with Scouts in another country. Make sure you and your leader read the International Links Guidance here.

7.  Take part in an activity that explores an international issue.

Explorers Award

  1. Be a member of Explorer Scouts for at least six months.

  2. Complete six nights away as an Explorer Scout of which four must be camping. Nights away must be different from any other nights away used in the other sections of this award. 

  3. Complete two activities from the International, Community and Values list. The two activities should come from different areas.

  4. Hold the Bronze Duke of Edinburgh Award, or complete the four Platinum Scout Challenges, which are:

    • take up a skill for three months, and show progress and lasting interest. The skill can be an existing interest or something entirely new

    • take up a physical activity for three months, completing an agreed programme of taking part and achievement

    • provide service to an individual or the community for three months. Briefing and training should be given in order to gain the necessary skills. This can include helping with another section as a Young Leader

    • complete a two day and one night expedition in rural country by foot, cycle, horse, canoe, boat or dinghy. The expedition should involve careful preparation, training, responsibility and review

Members must undertake an extra three months in any of the skills, physical recreation or service challenges.

  1. Be a member of Explorer Scouts or the Scout Network or both for at least 12 months. This can include any time counted for the Chief Scout’s Platinum Award.

  2. Complete 12 nights away as an Explorer Scout or member of the Scout Network, of which eight must be camping. This may include the nights counted for the Chief Scout’s Platinum Award. Nights away must be different from any other nights away used in the other sections of this award.

  3. Complete four activities from the list of International, Community and Values activities. This should include at least one from each area of the list and can include the activities completed for the International, Community and Values list as part of the Chief Scout’s Platinum Award.

  4. Hold the Silver Duke of Edinburgh Award, or complete the four Diamond Challenges, which are:

    • take up a skill for three or six months, and show progress and lasting interest. The skill can be an existing interest or something entirely new.

    • take up a physical activity for three or six months, completing an agreed programme of taking part and achievement.

    • provide service to an individual or the community for six months. Briefing and training should be given in order to gain the necessary skills. This many include helping with another section as a Young Leader or regularly helping at in the community at places such as a soup kitchen or animal shelter. 

    • complete a three day and two night expedition in rural or open country by foot, cycle, horse, canoe, boat or dinghy. The expedition should involve careful preparation, training, responsibility and review.

All Members should complete six months in either the physical activity or the skill.

Members who have not completed the Bronze Duke of Edinburgh’s Award or the Chief Scout’s Platinum Award must undertake an extra six months in either the Service Challenge or the longer of the Skills or Physical Recreation Challenge.

The Queen’s Scout Award is the top achievement for Explorer Scouts & Scout Network members and comprises of a variety of activities to complete.

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